Moving Bodies
Reviewed by David Kashimba

Moving Bodies by New York playwright Arthur Giron is a curious combination of sex and science, comedy and tragedy. In other words itís a lot like real life Ė a chaos of many conflicting elements, yet there is a semblance of order woven into this drama. Inspired by actual events and characters, it portrays the life of Nobel prize-winning physicist Richard Feyman who was one of the scientists that worked on the first nuclear bomb and the man that discovered the cause of the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster. But this is not a documentary and should be viewed as a work of Gironís imagination.

As often happens with works of the imagination, they take on a life of their own and touch audiences on many levels. This play too has a way of sneaking up on you. Though itís tone is mainly comic, it has a way of taking hold of all your emotions and shaking them. For me, it took me back to the day of the Challenger disaster. I was working for the Navy then and my boss, a Navy captain, had worked several years with the U.S. space program. Our entire Public Affairs office watched the launch and like most of the world, werenít immediately sure of the gravity of what we saw. But our captain knew immediately and briefed us on the reality of what had just happened. The play brought back the sorrow I felt for all those who had lost their lives in that disaster and quickly flooded into the present and what we all recently experienced on September 11th. Itís this kind of chain reaction that good drama sets into motion.

Moving Bodies was originally commissioned by the Alfred P. Sloane Foundation as part of Ensemble Studio Theartreís program to develop plays about the people behind science and technology. Under the direction of Marin Theatreís artistic director, Lee Sankowich and a stellar cast of Bay Area actors, Moving Bodies is an inspirational drama that will take you on a quantum leap of thoughts and emotions.

For tickets call (415) 388-5208 or visit www.marintheatre.org.

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